General Information for Kazakh travelers to get Vietnam visa at the Vietnam Embassy in Astana, Kazakhstan

Vietnam has opened its embassies in more than 70 nations across the globe, including Kazakhstan. That is why Kazakh inhabitants who plan to pay Vietnam a visit can come directly to the embassy to apply for a visa to Vietnam.

In order to obtain this type of visa, applicants need to fill in the required forms first, submit relevant documents and then settle the payment for mandatory fees. Visitors need to keep in mind that having a valid passport with at least six months of validity is a must unless they want to be rejected by the Immigration Department. During the visa processing time, they will be asked to complete the visa application form (click here to see an official sample) as well as mention the place of submission and collection of visa. Apart from the required documents, applicants also have to hand in their passport, a self-address envelope, and one photo which is taken within six months from the date they make the application.

Moreover, people will be required to pay the fees for the embassy to process their visa. Travelers should remember that these fees can be varied from embassy to embassy, so it is essential to check with the Vietnam Embassy before arriving. It then takes about five business days to process the documents. After that, Kazakh citizens will get their visa stamped onto their passport if there is nothing wrong happening.

If Kazakh residents are looking for the location of Vietnam Embassy in Kazakhstan, they can see below for the information of the embassy.

• Address: "Arman" Business Center, 6 Sary-Arka Str., Astana, Kazakhstan
• Tel: +7 7172 660375
• Fax: +7 7172 660379
• E-Mail: vnemb.kz@mofa.gov.vn
• Web: www.mofa.gov.vn/vnemb.kz

However, one of the drawbacks of getting a visa at the embassy is that the procedure is not convenient for the people who reside far from the embassy location. It would be hard for them to go back and forth between their home and the Vietnam Embassy several times. In addition, there are other disadvantages of requesting a Vietnam visa through the embassy. Visitors will have to send their original passport to the embassy, and there is a possibility that they might lose their document through this process. Also, the embassy takes a longer time to handle all the documents.

In this case, Kazakhs who are currently living far away from the Vietnam Embassy can opt for another option of getting Vietnam visa which is visa on arrival for Vietnam. To apply for this kind of visa, people can get in touch with a travel agency based in Vietnam like Greenvisa.io. Then, applicants only need to complete an online application form and submit it as well as settle the payment for their visa to be processed. After the request of their visa is approved, an approval letter will be sent to them via email. Travelers are advised to check this document carefully to find out if there is any mistake on this so the agency can fix it immediately.

Then, visitors from Kazakhstan need to print it out before traveling to Vietnam. Once they arrive at Vietnam international airport, they are required to provide their approval letter as well as the visa stamping fee at the Visa On Arrival counter to collect their Vietnam visa. For more detail information on a legal way to apply visa to Vietnam online, please visit https://www.greenvisa.io/

More News From Sports - Malaysian Talks

Japan's Rugby World Cup prepares for typhoons, earthquakes

Sep 20, 2018

TOKYO — Organizers of the 2020 Tokyo Olympics are concerned about it. So are those running the Rugby World Cup in Japan, which opens with Japan facing Russia on Sept. 20, 2019, in Tokyo. The concern? Natural disasters, like earthquakes and typhoons. This month, the strongest typhoon in 25 years hit the western part of the country, killing 11. A few days later, 41 people were killed by a powerful earthquake on the northern island of Hokkaido. "It's a real hot topic for us right now," tournament director Alan Gilpin said. The Rugby World Cup, held every four years, is...

Pyeongchang Olympics: Costly venues may eventually be razed

Sep 20, 2018

SEOUL, South Korea — The Pyeongchang Winter Olympics closed seven months ago. Left behind are empty venues, feuding over who pays for upkeep, and an icy ski course that's now an abandoned dirt runway, strewn with rocks and unused gondolas. Rare trees once stood before the course was gouged out of a mountainside, and plans called for replanting the piste and restoring the forest. Other venues sit mostly deserted: a speed-skating arena, a hockey center, a bobsled track and a ski-jump. Meanwhile, host Gangwon province has failed to persuade the national government to pay for maintenance, which would save the...

US Open champion Osaka dominant on return to action in Japan

Sep 20, 2018

TOKYO — Naomi Osaka's homecoming couldn't have gone much better. Playing in her first tournament since winning the U.S. Open, third-seeded Osaka impressed her Japanese fans Wednesday with a powerful 6-2, 6-1 win over Dominika Cibulkova to reach the quarterfinals of the Pan Pacific Open. Osaka was in control of the second-round match from the outset, breaking Cibulkova's serve in the first game at a sold-out Tachikawa Arena. "My first match (since the U.S. Open) in Tokyo felt really special," Osaka said. "I didn't really feel pressure, I felt more excitement because I knew that a lot of people were...

Koreas' leaders agree on military steps but whiff on nukes

Sep 20, 2018

SEOUL, South Korea — After holding consecutive summits with soaring but empty rhetoric, the two Korean leaders in their third try finally produced some substance. The meeting in Pyongyang on Wednesday came amid faltering nuclear negotiations between the U.S. and North Korea, which raised doubts about North Korean leader Kim Jong Un's stated willingness to relinquish his arsenal. A look at what was achieved, and what wasn't: ___ DENUCLEARIZATION According to a joint statement released by Seoul, North Korea agreed to permanently dismantle a launch pad and an engine-testing facility at its northwestern rocket-firing center in the presence of international...

Will flying cars take off? Japan's government hopes so

Sep 20, 2018

TOKYO — Electric drones booked through smartphones pick people up from office rooftops, shortening travel time by hours, reducing the need for parking and clearing smog from the air. This vision of the future is driving the Japanese government's "flying car" project. Major carrier All Nippon Airways, electronics company NEC Corp. and more than a dozen other companies and academic experts hope to have a road map ready by the year's end. "This is such a totally new sector Japan has a good chance for not falling behind," said Fumiaki Ebihara, the government official in charge of the project. Nobody...